New infographic, charting the things that happen during an NFL game.
Full size chart here: http://flipflopflyin.com/flipflopflyball/other-130112ravensbroncos.html
This is a work-in-progress concept. It has flaws. It’s a first attempt at charting an NFL game.

Before I explain further, I should mention that my knowledge of American football is minimal at best: I enjoy watching NFL games, I know what a quarterback is, but beyond the basics, I know nothing. The idea of making a chart like this came about because I want to understand the game better. My main sporting interest is baseball, and I had a thought that, to aid my understanding, I could take the idea of the baseball box score (giving the reader a brief overview of what happened during a game) and the idea of keeping score (using graphic elements and abbreviations to tell the story of a game), and applying those ideas in a graphic way to a football game. 

It is entirely possible that something like this already exists. I’ve seen the Drive Chart on NFL.com’s GameCenter,  but they don’t really tell me, a novice football follower, much graphically. In the chart, I am trying to keep the visual language as simple as possible, but also express as much as I can without the viewer having to keep referring back to the key to see what each graphic element means.

Like I mentioned, there are flaws. There are a few inconsistencies here and there, but I plan on doing another chart of a different game, hopefully this weekend, to address those flaws, and tighten up the concept and design a bit. For one thing, I’d like the next version of this to have fewer words. To add graphic symbols for interceptions, fumbles, penalties, and timeouts.

That being said, I figured it might be worth putting this online in its flawed state for people to look at. I’m moderately happy with this first attempt. I feel like a few more games of data might be enough to tighten up the concept to a point where I could hopefully be able to do something “live,” to follow along a game and fill out a chart, like I would keeping score at a baseball game. Oh, and one thing I guess I should mention: I’ve not changed ends for the teams when they change ends in the game. This is purely to keep the chart neat and understandable: Baltimore are playing left to right, Denver right to left. If you have any thoughts or questions, feel free to contact me.

New infographic, charting the things that happen during an NFL game.

Full size chart here: http://flipflopflyin.com/flipflopflyball/other-130112ravensbroncos.html

This is a work-in-progress concept. It has flaws. It’s a first attempt at charting an NFL game.

Before I explain further, I should mention that my knowledge of American football is minimal at best: I enjoy watching NFL games, I know what a quarterback is, but beyond the basics, I know nothing. The idea of making a chart like this came about because I want to understand the game better. My main sporting interest is baseball, and I had a thought that, to aid my understanding, I could take the idea of the baseball box score (giving the reader a brief overview of what happened during a game) and the idea of keeping score (using graphic elements and abbreviations to tell the story of a game), and applying those ideas in a graphic way to a football game. 

It is entirely possible that something like this already exists. I’ve seen the Drive Chart on NFL.com’s GameCenter,  but they don’t really tell me, a novice football follower, much graphically. In the chart, I am trying to keep the visual language as simple as possible, but also express as much as I can without the viewer having to keep referring back to the key to see what each graphic element means.

Like I mentioned, there are flaws. There are a few inconsistencies here and there, but I plan on doing another chart of a different game, hopefully this weekend, to address those flaws, and tighten up the concept and design a bit. For one thing, I’d like the next version of this to have fewer words. To add graphic symbols for interceptions, fumbles, penalties, and timeouts.

That being said, I figured it might be worth putting this online in its flawed state for people to look at. I’m moderately happy with this first attempt. I feel like a few more games of data might be enough to tighten up the concept to a point where I could hopefully be able to do something “live,” to follow along a game and fill out a chart, like I would keeping score at a baseball game. Oh, and one thing I guess I should mention: I’ve not changed ends for the teams when they change ends in the game. This is purely to keep the chart neat and understandable: Baltimore are playing left to right, Denver right to left. If you have any thoughts or questions, feel free to contact me.


Not about baseball, obviously, but here’s a chart I did for Grantland regarding the NFL playoffs.
http://www.grantland.com/blog/the-triangle/post/_/id/14734/lets-all-geek-out-over-this-nfl-playoff-graphic/

Not about baseball, obviously, but here’s a chart I did for Grantland regarding the NFL playoffs.

http://www.grantland.com/blog/the-triangle/post/_/id/14734/lets-all-geek-out-over-this-nfl-playoff-graphic/